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How a lesion of the brain results in that disturbance of consciousness known as sensory aphasia

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Published by s.n.] in [Baltimore .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Aphasia, Wernicke, etiology

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Morton Prince
ContributionsRoyal College of Surgeons of England
The Physical Object
Pagination14 p. :
Number of Pages14
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL26278537M

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neurological disorder known as Transcortical Sensory Aphasia (hereafter abbreviated TCSA). During the last decade, there has been a great resurgence of interest in TCSA and its associated semantic.   The Aphasia is a neurological disorder that occurs as a result of injury in brain areas that support language (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, ). This type of alteration can cause deficits in the expression, comprehension, reading and / or writing, completely or partially (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, ). Sensory disturbances from cerebral lesions. () by H Head, G Holmes Venue: Brain: Add To MetaCart. Tools. Sorted by These new results indicate that a modern cognitive neuro-science approach to the classical concept of the ‘body schema ’ may now be within reach. After a unilateral brain lesion, patients may show cross-modal. Aphasia usually results from disorders that do not cause progressive damage (eg, stroke, head trauma, encephalitis); in such cases, aphasia does not worsen. It sometimes results from a progressive disorder (eg, enlarging brain tumor, dementia); in such cases, aphasia progressively worsens.

It can follow either cortical, subcortical, or brain stem lesions. Anarthria should be kept separate from mutism (inability or unwillingness to speak in the absence of any brain lesion capable of affect the articulatory planning), as well as from dysarthria (a speech disorder due to weakness or incoordination of speech muscles).Cited by: 1. The Bilingual Brain: Bilingual Aphasia. verify the hypothesis whereby grammatical disorders in aphasia depend on the specific structure of each language. aphasia can also result from Author: Franco Fabbro. Impact of Aphasia on Consciousness Assessment: A Cross-Sectional Study Article (PDF Available) in Neurorehabilitation and neural repair 29(1) April with Reads How we measure 'reads'. Damage can result in the loss of consciousness or coma Pons A thick bundle of nerve fibers with connections mainly to the cerebellum, but it also has connections to tother parts of the brain.

aphasia (əfā`zhə), language disturbance caused by a lesion of the brain, making an individual partially or totally impaired in his ability to speak, write, or comprehend the meaning of spoken or written is distinguished from functional disorders such as stammering or stuttering, and from impaired speech due to physical defects in the organs used for speaking. aphasia (əfā`zhə), language disturbance caused by a lesion of the brain, making an individual partially or totally impaired in his ability to speak, write, or comprehend the meaning of spoken or written words. It is distinguished from functional disorders such as stammering or stuttering, and from impaired speech due to physical defects in the organs used for speaking. Sensory cortex (parietal lobe) - CL arm/face loss of sensation If dominant (usually left) side: Wernicke area (temporal lobe) - fluent aphasia/poor comprehension; Broca area (frontal lobe) - nonfluent aphasia/intact comprehension If nondominant (usually right) side: CL hemineglect. DEFINITION. Alexia is an acquired deficit in the ability to interpret written language; does not refer to those impairments (congenital or acquired early in life) which prevent the normal acquisition of reading skills (which are considered developmental dyslexia or simply dyslexia); HISTORY. Recognized for centuries, but became a significant problem only in 20th century, when literacy.